Last night, the William and Mary Alumni Association honored me with $1,000 as part of the Alumni Fellowship Teaching Award and I’ve just donated it back to the William and Mary Scholars Undergraduate Research Experience (WMSURE) that officially launched today: http://www.wm.edu/news/stories/2011/wmsure-seeks-to-expand-research-opportunities-123.php . I welcome all to support WMSURE as alumni as mentors, advocates, and donors and encourage others to do so as well: http://www.wm.edu/as/charlescenter/scholars/sure/support/index.php .

July 10-13, 2011 Anne and Christine will give three presentations and do a book signing at the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) Quest 2011 Conference in Washington, D.C. A book signing will follow. Click here for more schedule information.

Sunday, July 10, 1:00 p.m. -2:30 p.m. : AFT Pre-Teach Professional Development Network Conference: Using English Language Variation in US Schools

Monday, July 11, 5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. : Mini-Plenary Session: Understanding English Language Variation in U.S. Schools

Monday, July 11, 6:45 p.m. -7:45 p.m.: Book Signing

Tuesday, July 12, 9:00 a.m.- 10:45 a.m. : Workshop: Using Knowledge About Language Variation to Support Multicultural Literature Instruction: Models from African-American and Southern English

We are very pleased to announce that we have received a three-year research grant from the National Science Foundation to study the ways in which language plays a role in the educational challenges that often affect culturally and linguistically diverse students in STEM classrooms. Our goal is to work with teachers to figure out what challenges are being faced in terms of language for their math and science students and what resources teachers and students need to be able to face those challenges.  During the grant, “Assessing the Results of Sociolinguistic Engagement with K-12 STEM Education in Maryland and Virginia Public and Independent Schools,” we will work with K-12 STEM educators in the Baltimore and Richmond areas to collect data on how these educators learn from professional development workshops on language variation and integrate pedagogy and assessment techniques into their classroom. Our research also provides immediate practical application to educators’ pedagogy and practice in the form of educator workshops, teacher designed readings, and a website for educators that ensures that the research outcomes of our project are broadly disseminated.  Click here to read the official UMBC press release about the grant.

On May 11, 2011 from 11am to 12pm we will present at the International Reading Association Conference (IRA) with a book signing to follow from 1-2pm.  We will present a workshop entitled, “Using Knowledge About Language Variation To Support Multicultural Literature Instruction: Models From African American And Southern English” at the Orlando Convention Center West Building, W209C. Book signing will be at the Teachers College Press booth.  See you there!

This year the Teachers College Press Multicultural Education Series is celebrating its 15th Anniversary. A celebratory session will be held at AERA on Saturday from 12:25 to 1:55 in the Sheraton/Napoleon Ballroom B2. The attractive flyer that TC Press prepared for the celebration and the session
may be downloaded here: TCP.MCE.15.AERA.2011

You can now download Anne’s With Good Reason Podcast here: http://withgoodreasonradio.org/2011/01/hearing-past-the-accent/

Spoken Soul: Black English in the Classroom
January 8th, 2011

Podcast: Play in new windowDownload

Accents can be endearing – but they can also limit chances for professional and academic success.  Southern students and African-American students are often marginalized in the classroom because of their dialects.  Anne Harper Charity Hudley (College of William & Mary) is the co-author of a book to help educators work with language variations – to make sure students don’t suffer for the way they talk.  And: John Russell Rickford (Stanford University) has written a book on the topic: “Spoken Soul: The Story of Black English”.  Also featured: The Affrilachian Poets are celebrating 20 years.  Frank Walker coined the term in 1991 after he came away from a literary event frustrated by the exclusion of African American writers from Appalachian literature. Theresa Burriss (Radford University) is an expert on the Affrilachians and an honorary member of the group.

 

Hearing Past the Accent

January 8th, 2011
Accents can be endearing – but they can also limit chances for professional and academic success. Southern students and African-American students are often marginalized in the classroom because of their dialects. Anne Harper Charity Hudley (College of William & Mary) is the co-author of a book to help educators work with language variations – to make sure students don’t suffer for the way they talk. Also featured: The Affrilachian Poets are celebrating 20 years. Frank Walker coined the term in 1991 after he came away from a literary event frustrated by the exclusion of African American writers from Appalachian literature. Theresa Burriss (Radford University) is an expert on the Affrilachians and an honorary member of the group.

http://withgoodreasonradio.org/2011/01/hearing-past-the-accent/

Click here to download the podcast and to find local dates and times: http://withgoodreasonradio.org/when-to-listen/